Nutrition for the Brain: Niacin

Dr. Robert Melillo

Vitamin B3 for Brain HealthVitamin B3 or Niacin is important for healthy brain function as outlined in Dr. Robert Melillo’s book “The Disconnected Kids The Nutrition Plan.” This series, “Nutrition for the Brain,” will explore the nutrients that are most important to brain development and childhood health.

NIACIN, VITAMIN B3: MENTAL AGILITY

Also known as niacin, Vitamin B3 is important to the maintenance of healthy brain cells. It’s a potent antioxidant and plays a role in the signaling between nerve cells which in turn can help with mental agility. Niacin may even help improve the brain’s memory function. It also appears to have a calming effect on children.

VITAMIN B3 & AUTISM

Because of its potential calming effects, Vitamin B3 may help with autism-related stimming. It’s also known to stimulate the production of serotonin and melatonin to aid in sleep. However, the supplement form of Vitamin B3 in children with autism has been known to cause intense and unpleasant flushing so as always, use supplements with care and under the direction of a physician.

KID FRIENDLY FOODS THAT CONTAIN VITAMIN B3, NIACIN

Since B vitamins like Vitamin B3 are water-soluble and not stored in the body, it’s important to get adequate amounts daily through food. Vitamin B3 can be found in a wide variety of foods, including:

  • Avocado
  • Bacon (uncured, organic, and chemical-free)
  • Broccoli
  • Chicken Breast
  • Sweet Potatoes

More information on Vitamin B3 can be found on page 100 of my book “The Disconnected Kids Nutrition Plan.”

NIACIN (VITAMIN B3) INFOGRAPHIC

Vitamin-B3-Niacin-Infographic-Dr-Robert-Melillo

ABOUT THE BOOK

Disconnected Kids Nutrition Plan

Dr. Robert Melillo’s Brain Balance program has helped thousands of families across the country, offering a drug-free, scientifically based method for addressing a wide range of conditions, including autism spectrum disorders and ADHD. In this new book, he presents the nutritional side of The Brain Balance Program, featuring guidelines, tips, and kid-friendly recipes based on the latest scientific research on how food affects the brain.

Disclaimer: The information presented on this web site is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. All information is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment of specific medical conditions. Discuss this information with your healthcare provider to determine what is right for you and your family.

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